I recently had to figure out a way to encrypt a string sent from a JavaScript app client and then receive that string on an ASP.NET server and subsequently decrypt it. Below is first the client-side JavaScript code, and then the server-side C# code. The key and iv have to be the same on both client and server and should be concealed from any 3rd party if possible. I’ve used a random string “8056483646328763” as both here, but please change it if you use this code. Make sure the size arguments match the size of your key string, so 128/8…


In my previous article, I introduced three psychophysical laws which quantify the relationship between physical stimuli and mental sensations. These laws were derived from experiments that vary a physical stimulus on one dimension (e.g., brightness, heaviness) and ask the observer to somehow indicate the relative magnitude of each presentation of a stimulus lying somewhere along this uni-dimensional scale. The science of creating and carrying out such experiments is called psychophysics (psycho- meaning psychological/mental and physics meaning the physical). …


Psychology and cognitive science have at their foundation the notion that we can somehow measure the mental world. But can we? It is unclear, at least to the naïve observer, how such a goal could be achieved given that the mental is unobserved and private to each individual that has a mental capacity. However, there is good reason to think that we can relate the mental to the physical in a meaningful way. The methods for doing so were first developed by Gustav Fechner in the 1800s and were called Psychophysics (psycho meaning mental and physics meaning physical). …


Everyone has some concept of what attention is. Modern psychology defines it as the ability to select a portion of the information in our environment for further processing while ignoring other information. We use this ability constantly in our daily lives, for example, to read, use things and search for things. Utilizing this ability optimally helps us perform tasks at work (e.g., talking on the phone in the presence of background noise) and at play (e.g., catching a ball). Different people will use their attention in slightly different ways. However, attention shows marked differences in people with known cognitive impairments…

Alex Burmester, PhD

Cognitive Science and IT

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